Like most American kids that grew up in the 80's I watched the Indy 500 every year and became interested in motorsports thanks to that race, but I didn't really get hooked until I started watching Formula 1 racing in the late 90's. My favorite era were those years with the great Mika Hakkinen/Michael Schumacher battles. (I was a Mika Hakkinen fan) So my fondness for Formula 1 waned once Mika retired and Schumacher started winning everything, even at the expense of his teammate Rubens Barrichello. My interest in F1 has only been lukewarm since.

Then I turned to Champ Car racing here in the US for my motorsports fix. However that was quickly extinguished once Champ Car and Indy Car merged and we were stuck with Tony George and his many foibles. (It was entertaining to watch the Hulman/George drama I'll admit.) My interest has been less than lukewarm with Indy Car lately, even without Tony George at the helm.

Over time however, the excitement I once had for motorsports has slowly gone. Maybe it has to do with my age, I don't know. But I think I will pour my efforts into my Trooper and my interests in the outdoors to add excitement to my life.

Thanks for checking out my blog, I hope you enjoy it. I will still post racing news when I find something interesting or noteworthy.

Monday, August 2, 2010

Schumacher still out of control





(worldcarfans.com 8-2-10)

In the eyes of the foreign language media, Michael Schumacher was the bad-boy of Sunday's Hungarian grand prix.

In English, British tabloids called for the 41-year-old to return to retirement after pushing his former Ferrari teammate Rubens Barrichello towards the pitwall at the Hungaroring.

And even the Daily Telegraph said the Mercedes driver's "arrogance can no longer be tolerated in formula one".

In Italy, La Gazzetta dello Sport said the German finally "went too far" with the violent defence of tenth position.

"The arrogant Schumacher showed no remorse but is the same as ever; never his fault. It was a miracle that this manoeuvre did not end badly."

The Italian sports daily referred to the fact that the seven time world champion is an ambassador for the FIA's road safety campaign.

"A little advice for those starting their holidays; if someone tries to overtake you, please to the exact opposite of what the celebrated ex-champion did in Hungary."

La Repubblica and Corriere dello Sport called the move "madness", Il Secolo XIX said it marked his "demise", and Tuttosport said it was "dangerous".

"Barrichello just avoided crashing into the wall and landing in hospital, if not worse," added the report.

Corriere della Sera added: "Schumacher the villain, as he has always been."

Spain's sports newspaper Marca said: "Schumacher's return to formula one is one of the darkest chapters in the history of the sport."

At the same time, Schumacher posted an apology on his website, after viewing replays of the incident.

"I have to say the stewards were right in their decision. My move against him was too hard," he said.

"I clearly showed him that I didn't want to let him pass but, looking at it rationally, I wasn't seeking to endanger him (Barrichello) with my manoeuvre.

"If he feels I was then all I can say is sorry, this wasn't my intention," he added.

--------------------

Barrichello slams 'crazy' Schumacher

(by Pablo Elizalde autosport.com 8-1-10)

Rubens Barrichello slammed Michael Schumacher's driving during the Hungarian Grand Prix as 'horrendous' after the pair nearly crashed.

Williams driver Barrichello came within inches of touching the pit wall at around 300 km/h after Schumacher swerved to the right as the Brazilian tried to overtake along the main straight.

The duo came very close to making contact and Barrichello had to put part of his wheels on the grass to avoid a crash.

The Brazilian nonetheless passed Schumacher for tenth and went to score a point, but he was unimpressed with his former team-mate's driving.

"I have a lot of experience and usually with a crazy guy like that I would lift off, but not today, absolutely not," Barrichello told Spanish network La Sexta right after the race.

"I think it has been one of the most beautiful manoeuvres I've done and one of the most horrendous from him. At the end of the day we don't need that.

"To stop for three years and then come back and do something like that, we don't need it."

He added: "What I'm saying is that it wasn't necessary. The safety car came out at a time when it didn't help me, but it was a great race. I'm happy."

Schumacher shrugged off the incident, however.

"This is F1," Schumacher told Italian television RAI when questioned about his move.

"I think I left him too much room because he passed."

No comments: